Use a Counter with a Foreach Loop in Razor

Using bootstrap I wanted to create a two column grid with the data provided to the model. To accomplish this I needed to surround every two divs of class col-sm-6 with a div of class row. To do this I implemented a counter. I then used modulus to determine if I should open the tag or close it.

Another thing to note is that razor shows syntax errors if you just include an opening tag without its closing tag. If you run the code you will likely get a broken page complaining about missing curly braces. To get around this prepend each tag in their respective if-statements with @:.

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Convert Razor Validation Summary into Bootstrap Alert

In MVC, if you use the Validation Summary method any validation errors for the model are presented back to the user in a bulleted list. If you have been using bootstrap throughout the site you may want to give this message the same look and feel to have consistent interfacing. This error summary can easily be converted into a bootstrap alert to show to the user. Simply expand upon that call with this logic:

By default, @Html.ValidationSummary() returns nothing if no errors. But since we are adding additional markup for the bootstrap alert we must check for errors ourselves. The result will be a closable, danger alert with a heading and bulleted, error list inside.

Next, you may want to clean up the classes added by the validation summary. This can ensure that you will not have any CSS rendering issues as well as expanding upon the bootstrap look. I simply added this javascript at the bottom of my view:
The first call cleans up the list itself. The second call will put a bootstrap danger highlight around your fields with the issues. If the red outline does not appear then make sure you are following bootstraps recommendation of wrapping form elements and their labels in a form-group class. For example:

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AJAX and Bootstrap Tabbing in MVC

In this tutorial you will see the Twitter Bootstrap tabstrip in action. I will be using MVC, Razor and jQuery to accomplish this. If you visit the tabstrip documentation you will see an example that uses static tab content. I have expanded upon that code snippet, converting it to dynamic content using AJAX. I’m also utilizing a fading transition effect as the content loads. The tabstrip will interact with two partial views named: _SearchTab.cshtml and _SubmissionTab.cshtml. Notice that I am naming the tab ids the same as the partial views. Doing that reduces translation in the script when relaying the AJAX calls.

Markup:

The @Html.Partial will request the page on the active tab on page load. Place this call wherever the active class is being set.

Script:

The $.ajax() request retrieves the partial view. The cache parameter is necessary to ensure a fresh rebuild on each click. As for what path is requested you will notice a @ViewContext.RouteData.Values["controller"] call. It simply retrieves the controller of the current view, assuming the partial views are located in the same folder in the tree.

Controller:

The above methods are needed to relay the $.ajax() request to the proper partial view.

Now each time you click on a tab it will load dynamic content from a partial view. Keeping content separate can keep code cleaner and more organized. Download an example implementing this technique.

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